EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Waste Management in the Context of The Requirements of the Industrial Emissions Directive 2010/75/EU

Yuliya Makovetska and Tetyana Omelyanenko
Additional contact information
Yuliya Makovetska: Public Institution "Institute of Environmental Economics and Sustainable Development of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine", Kyiv
Tetyana Omelyanenko: Public Institution "Institute of Environmental Economics and Sustainable Development of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine", Kyiv

Economics of Nature and the Environment, 2014, pages 10-12

Abstract: Within the framework of the Association Agreement with the European Union, Ukraine has a number of commitments to bring its legislation into line with the European law. One of the most difficult directives to implement in both institutional and value terms is Directive 2010/75/EU on industrial emissions (integrated pollution prevention and control), covering basic industry sectors, which systematically affect the environmental quality - air, water, soil and form significant amounts of waste. The directive united, improved and made clearer legislation and cancelled several other directives in the field of prevention of industrial pollution. The provisions of the Directive on industrial emissions focus on the licensing system and procedures, as well as determining the overall structure of the integrated pollution prevention and its control. The goal of an integrated approach to pollution control is to prevent emissions and discharges to water and soil wherever possible, including waste management. The directive covers the following operations of waste management: 1. Disposal or recovery of hazardous waste with a capacity exceeding 10 tonnes per day. 2. Disposal or recovery of waste at combustion plants or at waste incineration plants for non-hazardous waste with a capacity exceeding 3 tonnes per hour and for hazardous waste with a capacity exceeding 10 tonnes per day. 3. Removing of non-hazardous waste with a capacity exceeding 50 tonnes per day. The Directive also covers landfills, receiving more than 10 tonnes of waste per day or with a total capacity exceeding 25 000 tonnes, as well as some cases of temporary and underground storage of hazardous waste. The analysis of national legislation reveals its low level of compliance with Directive 2010/75/EU. Thus, Ukraine is facing quite a significant amount of problems as due to imperfection of the legal framework, and considering the necessity for significant environmental modernization of Ukrainian enterprises. In particular, Ukraine is to take the following steps: adopt national legislation to meet the requirements of the Directive; make an inventorying of plants according to the list given in Annex I of the Directive (in particular, waste management); require entities to monitor emissions to air, discharges to water and soil; for new installations (including new landfills, waste incineration plants, etc.) - ensure that all requirements for placing into service are fulfilled.

Date: 2014
References: View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://economics-of-nature.net/uploads/arhiv/2014/Makovetska.Pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: http://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:ene:journl:y:2014:p:10-12

Access Statistics for this article

Economics of Nature and the Environment is currently edited by Ludmila Shashula

More articles in Economics of Nature and the Environment from Mykhaylo Khvesyk
Series data maintained by Ludmila Shashula ().

 
Page updated 2015-09-08
Handle: RePEc:ene:journl:y:2014:p:10-12