EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Could State-Level Variation in the Number of Land Trusts Make Economic Sense?

Heidi J. Albers () and Amy Whritenour Ando ()

Land Economics, 2003, vol. 79, issue 3, pages 311-327

Abstract: The number of land trusts in a state varies widely across the United States. Could such variation make economic sense? This paper models the optimal number of private conservation agents in a region and highlights two competing forces: spatial externalities in conservation that increase the efficiency of having few agents and diversity in conservation goals that means that specialization and de-concentration can be efficient. A state-level, count data analysis indicates that some observed patterns in the numbers of trusts are consistent with patterns expected in the optimal numbers of trusts. Some results identify areas for research and possible policy intervention.

JEL-codes: Q24 L31 H41 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2003
References: Add references at CitEc
Citations View citations in EconPapers (4) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://le.uwpress.org/cgi/reprint/79/3/311
A subscription is required to access pdf files. Pay per article is available.

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: http://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:uwp:landec:v:79:y:2003:i:3:p:311-327

Access Statistics for this article

More articles in Land Economics from University of Wisconsin Press
Series data maintained by ().

 
Page updated 2014-12-02
Handle: RePEc:uwp:landec:v:79:y:2003:i:3:p:311-327