EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Non-standard work: what’s it worth? Comparing alternative measures of workers’ marginal willingness to pay

Mark Bryan () and Andrea Geraci ()

No 2016-12, ISER Working Paper Series from Institute for Social and Economic Research

Abstract: We compare two alternative ways of measuring workers’ marginal willingness to pay (MWP) for four non-standard working arrangements: flexitime, part-time, night work, and rotating shifts. The first method is based on job-to-job transitions within a job search framework, while the second is based on estimating the determinants of subjective well-being. Using BHPS panel data from 1991-2008, we relate differences in the results to conceptual differences between utility and subjective wellbeing proposed recently in the happiness literature. We conclude that there is not a single representation of MWP: utility trade-offs (revealed by choices) need not be the same as wellbeing trade-offs; and we find evidence that subjective wellbeing is traded off against other goods that provide utility. Overall, we find that workers care particularly about their number of weekly hours.

New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-eur, nep-hap and nep-upt
Date: 2016-10-20
References: Add references at CitEc
Citations Track citations by RSS feed

Published

Downloads: (external link)
https://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/research/publications ... ers/iser/2016-12.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: http://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:ese:iserwp:2016-12

Ordering information: This working paper can be ordered from
Publications Office, Institute for Social and Economic Research, University of Essex, Wivenhoe Park, Colchester, Essex CO4 3SQ UK
https://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/publications/

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in ISER Working Paper Series from Institute for Social and Economic Research Publications Office, Institute for Social and Economic Research, University of Essex, Wivenhoe Park, Colchester, Essex CO4 3SQ UK. Contact information at EDIRC.
Series data maintained by Jonathan Nears ().

 
Page updated 2017-07-11
Handle: RePEc:ese:iserwp:2016-12