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Overborrowing and undersaving: lessons and policy implications from research in behavioral economics

Marques Benton, Stephan Meier () and Charles Sprenger

No 2007-4, Public and Community Affairs Discussion Papers from Federal Reserve Bank of Boston

Abstract: The U.S. household carries over $7,500 in uncollateralized debt and likely saves at a negative rate. There is a growing body of evidence that this borrowing and saving behavior may not, as assumed by standard economics, be the product of rational financial planning. This paper discusses insights from behavioral economics on how self-control problems could play a crucial role in determining such financial outcomes. It is important to note that self-control problems, as defined in this paper, are thought of as an issue affecting all people, not just those involved in our specific research. ; The paper reports results from a field study targeted to low-to-moderate income individuals conducted in Dorchester, MA. It links measured self-control to borrowing and savings outcomes taken from individual credit reports and survey questions respectively. We find that self-control problems are associated with higher borrowing, specifically on credit cards, and lower savings of income tax refunds. The paper discusses how policy prescriptions built around addressing self-control issues could prove helpful in improving financial outcomes.

Keywords: Consumer credit; Saving and investment (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2007
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