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Charity and Favoritism in the Field: Are Female Economists Nicer (to Each Other)?

Jason Abrevaya and Daniel Hamermesh ()

No 15972, NBER Working Papers from National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc

Abstract: Using a very large sample of matched author-referee pairs, we examine how the gender of referees and authors affects the former’s recommendations. Relying on changing matches of authors and referees, we find no evidence of gender differences among referees in charitableness toward authors; nor do we find any effect of the interaction between the referees’ and authors’ gender. With substantial research showing gender differences in fairness, the results suggest that an ethos of objectivity can overcome tendencies toward same-group favoritism/opposite-group discrimination.

JEL-codes: J71 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2010-05
Note: LS
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Published as Jason Abrevaya & Daniel S. Hamermesh, 2012. "Charity and Favoritism in the Field: Are Female Economists Nicer (To Each Other)?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 94(1), pages 202-207.

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Journal Article: Charity and Favoritism in the Field: Are Female Economists Nicer (To Each Other)? (2012) Downloads
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