EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Effects of Socio-Economic and Input-Related Factors on Polluting Plants' Location Decisions

Ann Wolverton ()

No 200808, NCEE Working Paper Series from National Center for Environmental Economics, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Abstract: Many environmental justice studies argue that firms choose to locate waste sites or polluting plants disproportionately in minority or poor communities. However, it is not uncommon for these studies to match site or plant location to contemporaneous socioeconomic characteristics instead of to characteristics at the time of siting. While this may provide important information on disproportionate impacts currently faced by these communities, it does not describe the relationship at the time of siting. Also, variables that are important to a plant's location decision – i.e., production and transportation costs - are often not included. Without controlling for such variables, it is difficult to evaluate the relative importance of socioeconomic characteristics in a firm’s initial location decision. This paper examines the role of community socioeconomic characteristics at the time of siting in the location decisions of manufacturing plants while controlling for other location-relevant factors such as input costs. When plant location is matched to current socioeconomic characteristics results are consistent with what the environmental justice literature predicts: Race is significant and positively related to plant location, while income is significant and negatively related to plant location. When plant location is matched to socioeconomic characteristics at the time of siting, empirical results suggest that race is no longer significant, though income is still significant and negatively related to plant location. Poverty rates are sometimes significant but act as a deterrent to plant location. Variables traditionally considered in the firm location literature - such as land and labor costs, the quality of labor, and distance to rail - are significant. The presence of pre-existing TRI plants in a neighborhood and average plant size are also significant.

Keywords: environmental justice; firm location (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2008-08, Revised 2008-08
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations View citations in EconPapers (4) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://yosemite.epa.gov/ee/epa/eed.nsf/WPNumber/2008-08/$File/2008-08.PDF First version, 2008 (application/pdf)

Related works:
Journal Article: Effects of Socio-Economic and Input-Related Factors on Polluting Plants' Location Decisions (2009) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: http://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:nev:wpaper:wp200808

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in NCEE Working Paper Series from National Center for Environmental Economics, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Contact information at EDIRC.
Series data maintained by Cynthia Morgan ().

 
Page updated 2014-11-16
Handle: RePEc:nev:wpaper:wp200808