EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Marrying Up: The Role of Sex Ratio in Assortative Matching

Ran Abramitzky (), Adeline Delavande () and Luis Vasconcelos ()
Additional contact information
Ran Abramitzky: Stanford University

No 09-030, Discussion Papers from Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

Abstract: By observing the large negative exogenous shock to the French male population from to WWI casualties, we study the effect of a change in the sex ratio on marital assortative matching by social class. First, we analyzed a novel data set that links marriage-level to French population and military mortality. Then, we calculated the sex ratio in a region with military mortality, which exhibits exogenous geographic variation. Ultiamtely, we found that men married women of higher social class than themselves more often in regions that experienced a larger decrease in the sex ratio. A decrease in the sex ratio of man to woman from 1.00 to 0.90 increased the probability that men married up by 8 percent. These findings provide insight into individuals’ preferences for spouses. Men appear to prefer to marry higher-class spouses, but cannot do so when the sex ratio is balanced.

Keywords: Marriage; sex ratio; assortative matching; social classes (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: J12 N34 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2010-02
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations View citations in EconPapers (9) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://www-siepr.stanford.edu/repec/sip/09-030.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
Journal Article: Marrying Up: The Role of Sex Ratio in Assortative Matching (2011) Downloads
Working Paper: Marrying Up: The Role of Sex Ratio in Assortative Matching (2010) Downloads
Working Paper: Marrying Up: The Role of Sex Ratio in Assortative Matching (2008) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: http://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:sip:dpaper:09-030

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in Discussion Papers from Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research
Contact information at EDIRC.
Series data maintained by Anne Shor ().

 
Page updated 2014-04-14
Handle: RePEc:sip:dpaper:09-030