EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

The regional employment impacts of renewable energy expenditures: The case for modelling

Grant Jordan Allan () and Michelle Gilmartin

No 1129, Working Papers from University of Strathclyde Business School, Department of Economics

Abstract: One aspect of the case for policy support for renewable energy developments is the wider economic benefits that are expected to be generated. Within Scotland, as with other regions of the UK, there is a focus on encouraging domesticallyâ€based renewable technologies. In this paper, we use a regional computable general equilibrium framework to model the impact on the Scottish economy of expenditures relating to marine energy installations. The results illustrate the potential for (considerable) ‘legacy’ effects after expenditures cease. In identifying the specific sectoral expenditures with the largest impact on (lifetime) regional employment, this approach offers important policy guidance.

Keywords: Renewable energy policy; regional economic impacts; computable general equilibrium modelling. (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: C68 R11 R58 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-cmp, nep-cse, nep-ene, nep-env and nep-geo
Date: 2011-08
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations Track citations by RSS feed

Published

Downloads: (external link)
http://www.strath.ac.uk/media/departments/economic ... 2011/11-29-Final.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
Working Paper: The regional employment impacts of renewable energy expenditures: The case for modelling (2011) Downloads
Working Paper: The regional employment impacts of renewable energy expenditures: The case for modelling (2011) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: http://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:str:wpaper:1129

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in Working Papers from University of Strathclyde Business School, Department of Economics
Contact information at EDIRC.
Series data maintained by Kirsty Hall ().

 
Page updated 2014-12-17
Handle: RePEc:str:wpaper:1129