EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

The Role of Parents in Problematic Internet Use among US Adolescents

Amy Bleakley, Morgan Ellithorpe and Daniel Romer
Additional contact information
Amy Bleakley: Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania, USA
Morgan Ellithorpe: Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania, USA
Daniel Romer: Annenberg Public Policy Center, University of Pennsylvania, USA

Media and Communication, 2016, vol. 4, issue 3, 24-34

Abstract: The internet has transformed the way youth communicate, learn, and network, with implications for their broader social, psychological, and physical health and well-being. With the technological capability of accessing the internet from anywhere, at any time, paired with the enormous variety of internet activities in which youth engage—from social networking to chatting to streaming videos to playing games to watching television content—instances of problematic internet behavior have emerged. We conducted an online national survey of 629 US adolescents ages 12–17 years old and a matching survey of one of their parents. We investigated the relationship between problematic internet behavior and parental monitoring, parental mediation of internet use, and parental estimates of their adolescent’s time spent using computers. Analyses showed that problematic internet use was associated with less parental monitoring and parental mediation and poorer parental relationships. Adolescents that spent a lot of time on the computer were also more likely to engage in problematic internet use. Although we cannot determine the direction of the relationships, results support the important role of parents in adolescents’ problematic internet use.

Keywords: adolescents; computer; time; internet; addiction; parental; mediation; parental; monitoring; problematic; internet; use (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2016
References: View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations View citations in EconPapers (2) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
https://www.cogitatiopress.com/mediaandcommunication/article/view/523 (text/html)

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:cog:meanco:v:4:y:2016:i:3:p:24-34

Access Statistics for this article

More articles in Media and Communication from Cogitatio Press
Series data maintained by António Vieira ().

 
Page updated 2017-09-29
Handle: RePEc:cog:meanco:v:4:y:2016:i:3:p:24-34