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The Motherhood Penalties: Insights from Women in UK Academia

Vera E. Troeger, Riccardo Di Leo, Thomas J. Scotto and Mariaelisa Epifanio
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Vera E. Troeger: University of Warwick and Universitat Hamburg
Riccardo Di Leo: University of Warwick
Thomas J. Scotto: University of Glasgow
Mariaelisa Epifanio: University of Liverpool

CAGE Online Working Paper Series from Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE)

Abstract: We use an original survey of academic women in the UK to investigate different dimensions of the motherhood penalty. Being a mother has no effect on salaries, but still slows down career progression even in such a high-skilled sector. Motherhood has an ambivalent impact on women’s perception of their working environment: improving satisfaction, but reducing perception of salary fairness relative to men. Our paper also explores how different policies can mitigate the motherhood penalties. We find that more generous maternity provisions are associated with higher salary, potentially because generosity reduces the crowding out of research activity. Better availability of childcare and an even distribution of responsibilities within the household correlate positively with earnings. Our findings also highlight the importance of a supportive work environment for mothers’ career and well-being at the workplace. Taken together, these findings suggest the necessity of a multi-faceted policy response to the motherhood penalties.

Keywords: satisfaction; salary; career; exclusion; gender pay gap; academia JEL Classification: (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2020
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-eur, nep-lab, nep-pke and nep-sog
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:cge:wacage:519

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