EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Assets and Liabilities and Scottish Independence

Monique Ebell and Dr Angus Armstrong ()

No 426, National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) Discussion Papers from National Institute of Economic and Social Research

Abstract: Scottish independence implies an economic future that is different from remaining in the United Kingdom. The economic debate largely comes down to whether this would leave Scots better or worse off. By most measures, Scotland's current economic standing is very similar to that of an average UK region. Output per head, income and unemployment are almost all exactly the same as the average UK region. This is not surprising given the economic and social integration and shared institutions, and is consistent with the idea of conditional convergence. This suggests that after controlling for differences in institutions and other characteristics (so-called 'initial conditions'), countries tend to converge to similar levels of income.[1] However, if Scotland becomes an independent nation, some of the shared UK assets, liabilities and institutions would need to be divided-up. This would change the 'initial conditions' for Scotland and the rest of the UK and therefore we would be likely to see a different economic future for both regions. See Barro and Sala-i-Martin, 1991

Date: 2014-04
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (2) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://www.niesr.ac.uk/sites/default/files/publications/dp426_0.pdf

Related works:
Journal Article: Assets and liabilities and Scottish independence (2014) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:nsr:niesrd:11820

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) Discussion Papers from National Institute of Economic and Social Research 2 Dean Trench Street Smith Square London SW1P 3HE. Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Library & Information Manager ().

 
Page updated 2020-12-02
Handle: RePEc:nsr:niesrd:11820