EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Multidimensional Inequality: An Empirial Application to Brazil

Patricia Justino (), Julie Litchfield and Yoko Niimi ()

No 24, PRUS Working Papers from Poverty Research Unit at Sussex, University of Sussex

Abstract: This paper illustrates two empirical approaches to the measurement of multidimensional inequality. The first approach is based on the analysis of the independent distribution of monetary and nonmonetary welfare attributes. The second approach considers pair-wise joint distributions of those attributes, hence allowing for differences in the various distributions, as well as possible correlations between the attributes. The analysis is based on household survey data from Brazil for 1996. We focus on inequalities in income, education, health and political participation outcomes. We calculate the extent of vertical and horizontal monetary and non-monetary inequalities, examine the determinants of both types of inequality and analyse their impact on household welfare. Our results show that economic analyses based solely on the distribution of income variables will not portray fully the degree of socio-economic and political inequalities in Brazil. In fact, traditional analysis of inequality may overestimate the extent of inequality, as education and other non-monetary welfare attributes appear to be more equally distributed in Brazil than income.

Keywords: multidimensional inequality; education inequalities; health inequalities; political inequalities; household data; Brazil (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: C23 D31 D63 I19 I29 O12 O54 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 36 pages
Date: 2004-05
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (10) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://www.sussex.ac.uk/Units/PRU/wps/wp24.pdf (application/pdf)
Our link check indicates that this URL is bad, the error code is: 404 Not Found

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:pru:wpaper:24

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in PRUS Working Papers from Poverty Research Unit at Sussex, University of Sussex Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Alvaro Herrera ( this e-mail address is bad, please contact ).

 
Page updated 2020-12-03
Handle: RePEc:pru:wpaper:24