EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Accounting for Wage Inequality in India

Puja Dutta ()

No 29, PRUS Working Papers from Poverty Research Unit at Sussex, University of Sussex

Abstract: This paper investigates the evolution and structure of wage inequality among adult male workers engaged in regular and casual wage employment in India during a period of radical economic change. The analysis exploits data from nationally representative employment surveys and uses decomposition techniques to examine the role played by educational achievement and industry affiliation. This paper finds that there are striking differences for the two groups of workers. Wage inequality rose between 1983 and 1999 among regular workers but fell among casual workers. While human capital (as embodied in age and education) is one of the major factors explaining both the level of and change in regular wage inequality, geographic location is the key determinant of casual wage inequality. Industry affiliation plays an equally important role for both sets of workers. These are also consistently the most important contributors to changes in inequality though the directional effects differ among the different sets of workers.

Keywords: India; wage inequality; inequality decomposition; segmented labour market (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: D33 J31 J42 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 31 pages
Date: 2005-01
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (41) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://www.sussex.ac.uk/Units/PRU/wps/wp29.pdf (application/pdf)
Our link check indicates that this URL is bad, the error code is: 404 Not Found

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:pru:wpaper:29

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in PRUS Working Papers from Poverty Research Unit at Sussex, University of Sussex Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Alvaro Herrera ( this e-mail address is bad, please contact ).

 
Page updated 2020-12-03
Handle: RePEc:pru:wpaper:29