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How to Think about Time-Use Data: What Inferences Can We Make about Long- and Short-Run Time Use from Time Diaries?

Harley Frazis and Jay Stewart

Annals of Economics and Statistics, 2012, issue 105-106, 231-245

Abstract: Time-use researchers are typically interested in the time use of individuals, but time use data are samples of person-days. Given day-to-day variation in how people spend their time, this distinction is analytically important. We examine the conditions necessary to make inferences about the time use of individuals from a sample of person-days. We also discuss whether and how surveys with multiple household members or multiple days are an improvement over single-diary surveys.

Date: 2012
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Related works:
Working Paper: How to Think About Time-Use Data: What Inferences Can We Make About Long- and Short-Run Time Use from Time Diaries? (2010) Downloads
Working Paper: How to Think About Time-Use Data: What Inferences Can We Make About Long- and Short-Run Time Use from Time Diaries? (2010) Downloads
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