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Malaria Prevalence, Indoor Residual Spraying, and Insecticide Treated Net Usage in Sub-Saharan Africa

Gabriel Picone (), Robyn Kibler () and Bénédicte Apouey
Additional contact information
Gabriel Picone: Department of Economics, University of South Florida
Robyn Kibler: Department of Economics, University of South Florida

Journal of African Development, 2017, vol. 19, issue 2, 19-32

Abstract: This paper examines the extent to which bed net usage is responsive to changes in malaria prevalence and whether indoor residual spraying crowds out bed net usage. We show that malaria prevalence increases the probability of sleeping under an insecticide treated net but the implied elasticities are below one. For children under five, a one percentage point increase in malaria prevalence increases the probability of sleeping under a bed net by 0.41 percentage point. We find that indoor residual spraying does not crowd out bed net usage. Instead, children under five who live in houses that were recently sprayed are 3.1 percentage points more likely to sleep under a bed net.

Keywords: Indoor residual spraying; Insecticide treated nets; Malaria prevalence (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: I12 I15 I18 H4 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2017
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Downloads: (external link)
http://www.afeawpapers.org/RePEc/afe/afe-journl/wp ... 19n2_Fall_2017_2.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
Working Paper: Malaria Prevalence, Indoor Residual Spraying, and Insecticide Treated Net Usage in Sub-Saharan Africa (2017)
Working Paper: Malaria Prevalence, Indoor Residual Spraying, and Insecticide Treated Net Usage in Sub-Saharan Africa (2017) Downloads
Working Paper: Malaria prevalence, indoor residual spraying, and insecticide-treated net usage in Sub-Saharan Africa (2013) Downloads
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