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CONSUMER PERCEPTIONS AND ATTITUDES TOWARDS BOVINE SOMATOTROPIN

Harry Kaiser (), Clifford W. Scherer and David M. Barbano

Northeastern Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, 1992, vol. 21, issue 1, 11

Abstract: This article investigates the possible negative effects of bovine somatotropin (bST) and antibiotic use in cows on fluid-milk consumption in New York State. Based on data from a consumer survey, the potential change in milk consumption due to bST and antibiotic use is estimated. In addition, the current perceptions of consumers about bST and antibiotics are measured, and the significant socioeconomic, demographic, and attitudinal characteristics of consumers that are related to their milk-consumption response to bST are identified. Depending upon consumer awareness of bST, the results indicate that milk consumption in New York State could decrease by 5.5% to 15.6% if bST is approved. The results also suggest that antibiotic use in cows could decrease milk consumption by 1.6% to 7%, depending upon consumer awareness. A major implication is that education will likely play an important role in influencing consumers' attitudes and perceptions about both bST and antibiotics.

Keywords: Consumer/Household Economics; Livestock Production/Industries (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 1992
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:ags:nejare:28850

DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.28850

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