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WAGE DETERMINATION FOR REGULAR HIRED FARM WORKERS: AN EMPIRICAL ANALYSIS FOR GEORGIA

Lewell F. Gunter

Southern Journal of Agricultural Economics, 1986, vol. 18, issue 2, 10

Abstract: Regular hired farm workers, performing 150 days or more of farm work annually, became increasingly important in the 1970's. The number of regular hired workers in the United States increased by almost 50 percent during the decade, while the number of seasonal workers, operators, and unpaid family workers declined. Pricing of regular hired labor is investigated through estimation of three nested wage determination models in a case study analysis for Georgia. Micro-level data on individual workers were used to analyze the effects of general human capital, farm worker duties, local labor market conditions, and farm characteristics on wage rates.

Keywords: Labor; and; Human; Capital (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 1986
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:ags:sojoae:29777

DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.29777

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