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The Effects of Youth Job Seeker Allowance in South Korea

Sung‐Eun Cho and Young‐Min Lee

Asian-Pacific Economic Literature, 2020, vol. 34, issue 2, 64-77

Abstract: The severity of youth unemployment in South Korea has prompted the government to implement various preventive measures such as employment services and vocational training. Local governments implemented a Youth Job Seeker Allowance in 2016 as a new form of support, which was adopted by the central government in 2017. This study examines the impact of the Youth Job Seeker Allowance in South Korea on employment. It finds that the allowance had a positive effect on employment; recipients of the allowance have a higher probability of being employed. However, recipients took longer to obtain employment than non‐recipients, corroborating previous studies that unemployment benefits lengthen the duration of unemployment. But, recipients of the allowance have more time to look for quality work. Therefore, although the Youth Job Seeker Allowance has the effect of demotivating recipients from looking for employment, its limited duration of three months obliges them to engage in job search activities. The study has implications for the introduction of Youth Job Seeker Allowance systems to support job search activities.

Date: 2020
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