EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

The End of Global Poverty: Is the UN Sustainable Development Goal 1 (Still) Achievable?

Christopher Hoy and Andy Sumner

Global Policy, 2021, vol. 12, issue 4, 419-429

Abstract: This paper asks whether the UN Sustainable Development Goal to end poverty is achievable in the aftermath of the COVID‐19 pandemic. We discuss various estimates of the poverty impact of the pandemic. We then differentiate growth‐poverty‐inequality pathways based on empirical observations from developing countries over the last 25 years. We take the most equitable growth pathways (characterised by mean household income/consumption expenditure growth per capita with the largest falls in inequality) and least equitable growth pathways (mean household income/consumption expenditure growth per capita with the largest rises in inequality) as a basis to extrapolate potential scenarios for poverty levels in 2030. Our main finding is that the SDG to end poverty is achievable (or something close) if the impact of the pandemic on income poverty is addressed and countries are able to follow the most equitable growth pathway after the pandemic has abated. In short, the greatest poverty reduction, and greatest likelihood of attaining the SDG poverty reduction goals, will occur if economic growth is combined with inequality reduction. In other words redistribution with growth.

Date: 2021
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
https://doi.org/10.1111/1758-5899.12992

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:bla:glopol:v:12:y:2021:i:4:p:419-429

Ordering information: This journal article can be ordered from
http://www.blackwell ... bs.asp?ref=1758-5880

Access Statistics for this article

Global Policy is currently edited by David Held, Patrick Dunleavy and Eva-Maria Nag

More articles in Global Policy from London School of Economics and Political Science Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Wiley Content Delivery ().

 
Page updated 2022-09-09
Handle: RePEc:bla:glopol:v:12:y:2021:i:4:p:419-429