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FROM SHAME TO GAME IN ONE HUNDRED YEARS: AN ECONOMIC MODEL OF THE RISE IN PREMARITAL SEX AND ITS DE-STIGMATIZATION

Jesus Fernandez-Villaverde (), Jeremy Greenwood and Nezih Guner ()

Journal of the European Economic Association, 2014, vol. 12, issue 1, 25-61

Abstract: Societies socialize children about sex. This is done in the presence of peer-group effects, which may encourage undesirable behavior. Parents want the best for their children. Still, they weigh the marginal gains from socializing their children against its costs. Churches and states may stigmatize sex, both because of a concern about the welfare of their flocks and the need to control the cost of charity associated with out-of-wedlock births. Modern contraceptives have profoundly affected the calculus for instilling sexual mores. As contraception improves there is less need for parents, churches, and states to inculcate sexual mores. Technology affects culture.

Date: 2014
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Related works:
Working Paper: From Shame to Game in One Hundred Years: An Economic Model of the Rise in Premarital Sex and its De-Stigmatization (2010) Downloads
Working Paper: From Shame to Game in One Hundred Years: An Economic Model of the Rise in Premarital Sex and its De-Stigmatization (2010) Downloads
Working Paper: From Shame to Game in One Hundred Years: An Economic Model of the Rise in Premarital Sex and its De-Stigmatization (2010) Downloads
Working Paper: From Shame to Game in One Hundred Years: An Economic Model of the Rise in Premarital Sex and its De-Stigmatization (2009)
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Journal of the European Economic Association is currently edited by Fabrizio Zilibotti, Dirk Bergemann, Nicola Gennaioli, Claudio Michelacci and Daniele Paserman

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