EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Job Polarization and Task-Biased Technological Change: Evidence from Sweden, 1975–2005

Adrian Adermon and Magnus Gustavsson ()

Scandinavian Journal of Economics, 2015, vol. 117, issue 3, 878-917

Abstract: In this paper, we show that between 1975 and 2005, Sweden exhibited a pattern of job polarization with expansions of the highest- and lowest-paid jobs compared to middle-wage jobs. The most popular explanation for such a pattern is the hypothesis of task-biased technological change, where technological progress reduces the demand for routine middle-wage jobs but increases the demand for non-routine jobs located at the tails of the job–wage distribution. However, our estimates do not support this explanation for the 1970s and 1980s. Stronger evidence for task-biased technological change, albeit not conclusive, is found for the 1990s and 2000s. In particular, there is both a statistically and economically significant growth of non-routine jobs and a decline of routine jobs. However, results for wages are mixed; while task-biased technological change cannot explain changes in between-occupation wage differentials, it does have considerable explanatory power for changes in within-occupation wage differentials.

Date: 2015
References: Add references at CitEc
Citations View citations in EconPapers (8) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/sjoe.12109 (text/html)
Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:bla:scandj:v:117:y:2015:i:3:p:878-917

Ordering information: This journal article can be ordered from
http://www.blackwell ... bs.asp?ref=0347-0520

Access Statistics for this article

Scandinavian Journal of Economics is currently edited by Richard Friberg, Matti Liski and Kjetil Storesletten

More articles in Scandinavian Journal of Economics from Wiley Blackwell
Series data maintained by Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing ().

 
Page updated 2017-11-10
Handle: RePEc:bla:scandj:v:117:y:2015:i:3:p:878-917