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Socio-economic Influences on the Health of Older Canadians: Estimates Based on Two Longitudinal Surveys

Neil Buckley (), Frank Denton, A. Robb () and Byron Spencer

Canadian Public Policy, 2006, vol. 32, issue 1, 59-84

Abstract: It is well established that there is a positive statistical relationship between socio-economic status (SES) and health, but identifying the direction of causation is difficult. This study exploits the longitudinal nature of two Canadian surveys, the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics and the National Population Health Survey, to study the link from SES to health (as distinguished from the health-to-SES link). For people aged 50 and older, who are initially in good health, we examine whether changes in health status over the next two to four years are related to prior SES, as represented by income and education. Although the two surveys were designed for different purposes and had different questions for income and health, the evidence they yield with respect to the probability of remaining in good health is similar. Both suggest that SES does play a role and that the differences across SES groups are quantitatively significant, increase with age, and are much the same for men and women.

Date: 2006
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Working Paper: Socioeconomic Influences on the Health of Older Canadians: Estimates Based on Two Longitudinal Surveys (2005) Downloads
Working Paper: Socioeconomic Influences on the Health of Older Canadians: Estimates Based on Two Longitudinal Surveys (2005) Downloads
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