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The Effects of In-Work Benefit Reform in Britain on Couples: Theory and Evidence

Marco Francesconi (), Helmut Rainer () and Wilbert vanderKlaauw
Authors registered in the RePEc Author Service: Wilbert H van der Klaauw ()

Economic Journal, 2009, vol. 119, issue 535, F66-F100

Abstract: This article develops a simple model of household decisions that explicitly accounts for the role played by the Working Families' Tax Credit (WFTC) to examine its effects on couples in Britain. The main implications of the model are tested using panel data from the British Household Panel Survey collected between 1991 and 2002. Overall, the financial incentives of the reform had small and statistically insignificant effects on a wide range of married mothers' decisions. Women's responses, however, were highly heterogeneous, depending on their partners' labour supply and earnings. Copyright © The Author(s). Journal compilation © Royal Economic Society 2009.

Date: 2009
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Working Paper: The effects of in-work benefit reform in Britain on couples: Theory and evidence (2009)
Working Paper: The Effects of In-Work Benefit Reform in Britain on Couples: Theory and Evidence (2007) Downloads
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