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Modern Management: Good for the Environment or Just Hot Air?

Nicholas Bloom (), Christos Genakos (), Ralf Martin () and Raffaella Sadun ()

Economic Journal, 2010, vol. 120, issue 544, 551-572

Abstract: We use an innovative methodology to measure management practices in over 300 manufacturing firms in the UK. We then match this management data to production and energy usage information for establishments owned by these firms. We find that establishments in better managed firms are significantly less energy intensive. This effect is quantitatively substantial: going from the 25th to the 75th percentile of management practices is associated with a 17.4% reduction in energy intensity. Better managed firms are also significantly more productive. These results suggest that management practices that are associated with improved productivity are also linked to lower greenhouse gas emissions. Copyright © The Author(s). Journal compilation © Royal Economic Society 2010.

Date: 2010
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Working Paper: Modern Management: Good for the Environment or Just Hot Air? (2008) Downloads
Working Paper: Modern management: good for the environment or just hot air? (2008) Downloads
Working Paper: Modern Management: Good for the Environment or just Hot Air? (2008) Downloads
Working Paper: Modern Management: Good for the Environment of Just Hot Air? (2008) Downloads
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