EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Cultural socialization practices among Latino immigrant families within a restrictive immigration socio-political context

Cecilia Ayón, Imelda Ojeda and Elizabeth Ruano

Children and Youth Services Review, 2018, vol. 88, issue C, 57-65

Abstract: Cultural socialization has been linked to positive ethnic identity development and found to serve as a buffer to discrimination. The current restrictive immigration political climate may hinder parents' abilities to transmit their culture of origin to children, and impact child health outcomes and development. Fifty-two in-depth interviews with Mexican immigrant parents were used to learn how they culturally socialize their children within an anti-immigrant political climate. Findings revealed two underlying themes in parents' narratives; family context and storytelling. Parents described multiple strategies used to connect their children with their culture of origin; contando mis historias, food, religious practices, traveling to their country of origin, community events and celebrations, and the Spanish language. Parents used photos and web resources to facilitate the cultural socialization process. Parents also described negotiating how to integrate two cultures (country of origin and U.S. American host culture) with their children and within themselves. Recommendations are made for engaging families in culturally informed practice and interventions.

Keywords: Immigrant families; Mexican families; Ethnicity and culture; Cultural socialization (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2018
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0190740917309155
Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:eee:cysrev:v:88:y:2018:i:c:p:57-65

Access Statistics for this article

Children and Youth Services Review is currently edited by Duncan Lindsey

More articles in Children and Youth Services Review from Elsevier
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Dana Niculescu ().

 
Page updated 2018-06-02
Handle: RePEc:eee:cysrev:v:88:y:2018:i:c:p:57-65