EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

The short term impact of a productive asset transfer in families with child labor: Experimental evidence from the Philippines

Eric Edmonds and Caroline Theoharides

Journal of Development Economics, 2020, vol. 146, issue C

Abstract: Productive asset grants have become an important tool in efforts to push the very poor out of poverty, but they require labor to convert the asset into income. Using a clustered randomized trial, we evaluate the impact of a key component of the Government of Philippines' child labor elimination program, a $518 productive asset grant directed at families with child laborers. We find that households rely upon family members for the labor to work the asset. Adolescent labor is the most available labor in the household, and we observe increases in employment among adolescents not engaged in child labor at baseline. Households with a family firm or business prior to treatment especially lack available adult labor to work with the asset, leading to increases in child labor, including hazardous work, amongst children who were not in child labor at baseline.

Keywords: Self-employment; Sustainable livelihoods; Asset transfer; Child well-being; Child labor; Philippines (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: J13 J82 O15 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2020
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (4) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304387820300614
Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

Related works:
Working Paper: The Short Term Impact of a Productive Asset Transfer in Families with Child Labor: Experimental Evidence from the Philippines (2019) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:eee:deveco:v:146:y:2020:i:c:s0304387820300614

DOI: 10.1016/j.jdeveco.2020.102486

Access Statistics for this article

Journal of Development Economics is currently edited by M. R. Rosenzweig

More articles in Journal of Development Economics from Elsevier
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Catherine Liu ().

 
Page updated 2021-09-23
Handle: RePEc:eee:deveco:v:146:y:2020:i:c:s0304387820300614