EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Directed technical change and the adoption of CO2 abatement technology: The case of CO2 capture and storage

Vincent M. Otto and John Reilly

Energy Economics, 2008, vol. 30, issue 6, 2879-2898

Abstract: This paper studies the cost-effectiveness of combining traditional environmental policy, such as CO2-trading schemes, and technology policy that has aims of reducing the cost and speeding the adoption of CO2 abatement technology. For this purpose, we develop a dynamic general equilibrium model that captures empirical links between CO2 emissions associated with energy use, directed technical change and the economy. We specify CO2 capture and storage (CCS) as a discrete CO2 abatement technology. We find that combining CO2-trading schemes with an adoption subsidy is the most effective instrument to induce adoption of the CCS technology. Such a subsidy directly improves the competitiveness of the CCS technology by compensating for its markup over the cost of conventional electricity. Yet, introducing R&D subsidies throughout the entire economy leads to faster adoption of the CCS technology as well and in addition can be cost-effective in achieving the abatement target.

Keywords: CO2; capture; and; storage; Computable; general; equilibrium; modeling; Directed; technical; change; Environmental; policy; Technology; policy (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2008
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (22) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0140-9883(07)00081-3
Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:eee:eneeco:v:30:y:2008:i:6:p:2879-2898

Access Statistics for this article

Energy Economics is currently edited by R. S. J. Tol, Beng Ang, Lance Bachmeier, Perry Sadorsky, Ugur Soytas and J. P. Weyant

More articles in Energy Economics from Elsevier
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Dana Niculescu ().

 
Page updated 2019-04-01
Handle: RePEc:eee:eneeco:v:30:y:2008:i:6:p:2879-2898