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Promises and pitfalls in environmentally extended input–output analysis for China: A survey of the literature

Jacob Hawkins, Chunbo Ma (), Steven Schilizzi and Fan Zhang

Energy Economics, 2015, vol. 48, issue C, 81-88

Abstract: As the world's largest developing economy, China plays a key role in global climate change and other environmental impacts of international concern. Environmentally extended input–output analysis (EE-IOA) is an important and insightful tool seeing widespread use in studying large-scale environmental impacts in China: calculating and analyzing greenhouse gas emissions, carbon and water footprints, pollution, and embodied energy. This paper surveys the published articles regarding EE-IOA for China in peer-reviewed journals and provides a comprehensive and quantitative overview of the body of literature, examining the research impact, environmental issues addressed, and data utilized. The paper further includes a discussion of the shortcomings in official Chinese data and of the potential means to move beyond its inherent limitations.

Keywords: China; Environmentally extended; Input–output analysis (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: C67 D57 F18 O53 Q4 Q5 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2015
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:eee:eneeco:v:48:y:2015:i:c:p:81-88

DOI: 10.1016/j.eneco.2014.12.002

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