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Agriculture, forestry, and other land-use emissions in Latin America

Katherine V. Calvin, Robert Beach (), Angelo Gurgel (), Maryse Labriet and Ana Maria Loboguerrero Rodriguez

Energy Economics, 2016, vol. 56, issue C, 615-624

Abstract: Nearly 40% of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in Latin America were from agriculture, forestry, and other land use (AFOLU) in 2008, more than double the global fraction of AFOLU emissions. In this article, we investigate the future trajectory of AFOLU GHG emissions in Latin America, with and without efforts to mitigate, using a multi-model comparison approach. We find significant uncertainty in future emissions with and without climate policy. This uncertainty is due to differences in a variety of assumptions including (1) the role of bioenergy, (2) where and how bioenergy is produced, (3) the availability of afforestation options in climate mitigation policy, and (4) N2O and CH4 emission intensity. With climate policy, these differences in assumptions can lead to significant variance in mitigation potential, with three models indicating reductions in AFOLU GHG emissions and one model indicating modest increases in AFOLU GHG emissions.

Keywords: Agriculture and land use; Greenhouse gas emissions; Latin America (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: O5 Q10 Q18 Q47 Q54 Q56 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2016
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:eee:eneeco:v:56:y:2016:i:c:p:615-624

DOI: 10.1016/j.eneco.2015.03.020

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Energy Economics is currently edited by R. S. J. Tol, Beng Ang, Lance Bachmeier, Perry Sadorsky, Ugur Soytas and J. P. Weyant

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