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How much load flexibility can a euro buy? Findings from a contingent valuation experiment with companies in the German commerce and services sector

Mark Olsthoorn, Joachim Schleich, Katharina Wohlfarth and Marian Klobasa

Energy Economics, 2019, vol. 84, issue S1

Abstract: Demand-side load management is considered a cost-efficient solution for accommodating growing shares of intermittent renewable electricity production. We employ a double-bounded dichotomous choice contingent valuation (CV) experiment with 275 companies in the German commerce and services sector to estimate the effectiveness of a subsidy to make their ventilation, air conditioning, refrigeration and freezing systems available for automated load management. Our estimates suggest that a given subsidy would unlock more flexible load at lower per MWh subsidy costs from air conditioning compared to ventilation. We find no effect of subsectors and the proposed frequency and duration of the load curtailments on the subsidy level. Subsidy levels in the center of the distribution yield specific subsidy costs that suggest that load management in the commerce and services sector may become a competitive option on the balancing market.

Keywords: Load management; Demand response; Subsidies; Contingent valuation (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: Q41 Q48 Q51 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2019
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:eee:eneeco:v:84:y:2019:i:s1:s0140988319303986

DOI: 10.1016/j.eneco.2019.104603

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