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Nurses’ labour supply elasticities: The importance of accounting for extensive margins

Barbara Hanel, Guyonne Kalb and Anthony Scott ()
Authors registered in the RePEc Author Service: Barbara Broadway ()

Journal of Health Economics, 2014, vol. 33, issue C, 94-112

Abstract: We estimate a multi-sector model of nursing qualification holders’ labour supply in different occupations. A structural approach allows us to model the labour force participation decision, the occupational and shift-type choice, and the decision about hours worked as a joint outcome following from maximising a utility function. Disutility from work is allowed to vary by occupation and also by shift type in the utility function. Our results suggest that average wage elasticities might be higher than previous research has found. This is mainly due to the effect of wages on the decision to enter or exit the profession, which was not included in the previous literature, rather than from its effect on increased working hours for those who already work in the profession.

Keywords: Nursing; Labour supply; Shift work; Wage elasticities (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: I10 I11 J22 J24 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2014
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Related works:
Working Paper: Nurses' Labour Supply Elasticities: The Importance of Accounting for Extensive Margins (2012) Downloads
Working Paper: Nurses' Labour Supply Elasticities: The Importance of Accounting for Extensive Margins (2012) Downloads
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:33:y:2014:i:c:p:94-112

DOI: 10.1016/j.jhealeco.2013.11.001

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Journal of Health Economics is currently edited by J. P. Newhouse, A. J. Culyer, R. Frank, K. Claxton and T. McGuire

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