EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Why are pollution damages lower in developed countries? Insights from high-Income, high-particulate matter Hong Kong

Jonathan Colmer (), Dajun Lin, Siying Liu and Jay Shimshack

Journal of Health Economics, 2021, vol. 79, issue C

Abstract: Conventional wisdom suggests that marginal damages from particulate matter pollution are high in less-developed countries because they are highly polluted. Using administrative data on the universe of births and deaths, we explore birthweight and mortality effects of gestational particulate matter exposure in high-pollution yet high-income Hong Kong. The marginal effects of particulates on birthweight are large but we fail to detect an effect on neonatal mortality. We interpret our stark mortality results in a comparative analysis of pollution-mortality relationships across studies. We provide early evidence that marginal mortality damages from pollution are high in less-developed countries because they are less developed, not because they are more polluted.

JEL-codes: I15 Q53 Q56 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2021
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167629621000965
Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

Related works:
Working Paper: Why Are Pollution Damages Lower in Developed Countries? Insights from High-Income, High-Particulate Matter Hong Kong (2021) Downloads
Working Paper: Why Are Pollution Damages Lower in Developed Countries? Insights from High-Income, High-Particulate Matter Hong Kong (2021) Downloads
Working Paper: Why are pollution damages lower in developed countries? Insights from high income, high-particulate matter Hong Kong (2020) Downloads
Working Paper: Why are pollution damages lower in developed countries? Insights from high income, high-particulate matter Hong Kong (2020) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:79:y:2021:i:c:s0167629621000965

DOI: 10.1016/j.jhealeco.2021.102511

Access Statistics for this article

Journal of Health Economics is currently edited by J. P. Newhouse, A. J. Culyer, R. Frank, K. Claxton and T. McGuire

More articles in Journal of Health Economics from Elsevier
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Catherine Liu ().

 
Page updated 2022-09-19
Handle: RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:79:y:2021:i:c:s0167629621000965