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Money demand stability: A case study of Nigeria

Saten Kumar, Don Webber () and Scott Fargher

Journal of Policy Modeling, 2013, vol. 35, issue 6, 978-991

Abstract: Monetary policy in Nigeria aims is to achieve price and monetary stability. During the 1980s and 1990s, monetary targeting was the dominant monetary policy framework in Nigeria. However, in 2006 the Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) adopted the new monetary policy framework through which short-term interest rates are adjusted to achieve stability in the value of the domestic currency. This paper has presented an empirical investigation into the demand for Nigerian real narrow money (M1) over the period 1960–2008 in an attempt to identify whether the CBN were right to adopt the new monetary policy framework. In doing so, we estimate alternative (canonical and extended) specifications of M1 demand using structural change methods. Our results suggest that the canonical specification is well-determined. Although the money demand relationship went through a regime shift in 1986, it is largely stable. These findings favour the use of supply of money as an instrument of monetary policy, thus lending limited support for the new monetary policy framework.

Keywords: Money demand; Structural breaks; Cointegration; Monetary policy (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: E21 C22 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2013
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Working Paper: Money demand stability: A case study of Nigeria (2011) Downloads
Working Paper: Money demand stability: A case study of Nigeria (2010) Downloads
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:eee:jpolmo:v:35:y:2013:i:6:p:978-991

DOI: 10.1016/j.jpolmod.2013.03.012

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