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Simulating the impact of transport infrastructure investment on wages: A dynamic spatial panel model approach

Bernard Fingleton () and Nikodem Szumilo

Regional Science and Urban Economics, 2019, vol. 75, issue C, 148-164

Abstract: This paper estimates the impact of a multi-billion pound investment in Britain's rail transport infrastructure, in the form of high-speed rail links, on wage levels across each of 347 districts of England and Wales. The impacts are based on a dynamic spatial panel model adaptation of standard urban economics based on employment density and commuting patterns. This allows estimation of these global impacts operating via improved commuting times. We demonstrate that while estimates of a traditional market potential approach with fixed effects are to some extent qualitatively and quantitatively similar to our predictions, our predictions allow more heterogeneous effects and give more accurate forecasts. The study finds that on average wages increase by around 2% as employment centres gain improved access to more skilled workers and as spillover effects become spatially more extensive. While most areas see modest positive effects, some locations are negatively affected, in the extreme case by as much as 7%.

Keywords: Dynamic spatial panel model; Simulation; Prediction; Transport infrastructure; Commuting; Wages; Regional development (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: C33 C53 J31 R11 R12 R4 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2019
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