EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Surname-based ethnicity and ethnic segregation in the early twentieth century U.S

Dafeng Xu

Regional Science and Urban Economics, 2019, vol. 77, issue C, 1-19

Abstract: In this paper, I discuss a new measure of ethnicity in historical U.S. census data, and apply it in segregation studies. In the early twentieth century U.S., three major sending countries of Central and Eastern European immigrants—namely, Germany, Poland, and Russia—had high degrees of ethnic and cultural diversity. The population in all three countries comprised largely of a mixture of German, Polish, Russian, and Jewish ethnic groups. Consequently, there might be significant heterogeneity in ethnicity among U.S. immigrants born in the same home country. Focusing on the above three sending countries in the 1920 and 1930 U.S. census, I construct an ethnicity variable based essentially on the linguistic origin of the surname. Employing this variable, I examine ethnic segregation within each immigrant group defined based on the country of birth. Results suggest high degrees of within-group ethnic segregation. In particular, ethnic majorities within each group generally resided in areas with significantly more compatriots.

Keywords: Immigration; Name; Ethnicity; Segregation; Early twentieth century U.S (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2019
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0166046218302114
Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:eee:regeco:v:77:y:2019:i:c:p:1-19

DOI: 10.1016/j.regsciurbeco.2019.01.005

Access Statistics for this article

Regional Science and Urban Economics is currently edited by D.P McMillen and Y. Zenou

More articles in Regional Science and Urban Economics from Elsevier
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Haili He ().

 
Page updated 2020-05-02
Handle: RePEc:eee:regeco:v:77:y:2019:i:c:p:1-19