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Understanding and misunderstanding randomized controlled trials

Angus Deaton () and Nancy Cartwright

Social Science & Medicine, 2018, vol. 210, issue C, 2-21

Abstract: Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs) are increasingly popular in the social sciences, not only in medicine. We argue that the lay public, and sometimes researchers, put too much trust in RCTs over other methods of investigation. Contrary to frequent claims in the applied literature, randomization does not equalize everything other than the treatment in the treatment and control groups, it does not automatically deliver a precise estimate of the average treatment effect (ATE), and it does not relieve us of the need to think about (observed or unobserved) covariates. Finding out whether an estimate was generated by chance is more difficult than commonly believed. At best, an RCT yields an unbiased estimate, but this property is of limited practical value. Even then, estimates apply only to the sample selected for the trial, often no more than a convenience sample, and justification is required to extend the results to other groups, including any population to which the trial sample belongs, or to any individual, including an individual in the trial. Demanding ‘external validity’ is unhelpful because it expects too much of an RCT while undervaluing its potential contribution. RCTs do indeed require minimal assumptions and can operate with little prior knowledge. This is an advantage when persuading distrustful audiences, but it is a disadvantage for cumulative scientific progress, where prior knowledge should be built upon, not discarded. RCTs can play a role in building scientific knowledge and useful predictions but they can only do so as part of a cumulative program, combining with other methods, including conceptual and theoretical development, to discover not ‘what works’, but ‘why things work’.

Keywords: RCTs; Balance; Bias; Precision; External validity; Transportation of results; Health; Economic development (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2018
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Related works:
Working Paper: Understanding and misunderstanding randomized controlled trials (2017) Downloads
Working Paper: Understanding and Misunderstanding Randomized Controlled Trials (2016) Downloads
Working Paper: Understanding and Misunderstanding Randomized Controlled Trials (2016) Downloads
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