EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Income polarization in the USA: What happened to the middle class in the last few decades?

Francesco Schettino () and Haider Khan ()

Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, 2020, vol. 53, issue C, 149-161

Abstract: With increasing income inequality in the US over the last few decades, what has happened to the middle class? The aggregate inequality indexes don't answer this question. We employ Relative Distribution tools and use the ASEC-CPS dataset in order to provide an analysis of the US income distribution and trace the impact of inequality on the middle class. We observe confirming the Pew study of 2016a typical polarization profile has emerged during 1998–2018 with a shift of many middle class families towards the lower end of income distribution. The hypothesis of the hollowing out of the middle class in the US starting with the age of Reaganomics is also confirmed. We also find some preliminary evidence for intersectionality, i.e. race, class and gender working together in a vicious cycle for the disadvantaged. Policies to counteract these tendencies must be anti-polarization policies along with those of relatively more egalitarian growth.

Keywords: Polarization; Political economy of the US; Relative distribution tools; Middle class; Inequalities; Growth effect; Distribution effect (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: D31 D63 O15 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2020
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (2) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0954349X19301973
Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:eee:streco:v:53:y:2020:i:c:p:149-161

DOI: 10.1016/j.strueco.2019.12.003

Access Statistics for this article

Structural Change and Economic Dynamics is currently edited by F. Duchin, H. Hagemann, M. Landesmann, R. Scazzieri, A. Steenge and B. Verspagen

More articles in Structural Change and Economic Dynamics from Elsevier
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Catherine Liu ().

 
Page updated 2021-10-15
Handle: RePEc:eee:streco:v:53:y:2020:i:c:p:149-161