EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Speed limit laws in America: The role of geography, mobility and ideology

Daniel Albalate () and Germà Bel ()

Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, 2012, vol. 46, issue 2, 337-347

Abstract: Speed limits had been centralized at the federal level since 1974, until decisions were devolved to the states in 1995. However, the centralization debate has reemerged in recent years. This paper conducts the first econometric analysis of the determinants of speed limit laws and State reactions after the repeal. By using mobility, geographic and political variables, our results suggest that geography – which reflects private mobility needs and social preferences –, is one of the main factors influencing speed limit laws, together with political ideology. Furthermore, we identify the presence of regional and time diffusion effects. By presenting first evidence on policy determinants, we provide a better understanding of the formulation of the heterogeneity of speed limits in US and offer implications for the debate on centralization and decentralization of transport policy.

Keywords: Transport policy; Speed limits; Decentralization; Transportation (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2012
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (1) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S096585641100156X
Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:eee:transa:v:46:y:2012:i:2:p:337-347

Ordering information: This journal article can be ordered from
http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/supportfaq.cws_home/regional
https://shop.elsevie ... _01_ooc_1&version=01

Access Statistics for this article

Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice is currently edited by John (J.M.) Rose

More articles in Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice from Elsevier
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Dana Niculescu ().

 
Page updated 2020-01-06
Handle: RePEc:eee:transa:v:46:y:2012:i:2:p:337-347