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Hypothetical bias in Stated Choice Experiments: Is it a problem? And if so, how do we deal with it?

Simon Fifer, John Rose () and Stephen Greaves

Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, 2014, vol. 61, issue C, 164-177

Abstract: The extent to which Stated Choice (SC) experiments suffer from hypothetical bias continues to be a controversial topic in the literature. This research provides further evidence in this debate by examining the existence of hypothetical bias in a transport-related SC experiment. Data for this research were sourced from a University of Sydney study exploring the effect of exposure-based charging on motorist behaviour. The sample included 148 Sydney motorists who were recruited to take part in the 10-week GPS driving field study (Revealed Preference/RP data). In addition, participants were also required to complete an SC survey which was designed to mimic the RP decision context in order to capture what participants indicated they would do as opposed to what participants actually did in reaction to the charging regime.

Keywords: Hypothetical bias; Stated choice; Willingness to pay; Cheap talk; Certainty scales; GPS (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2014
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