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Herbal-Based Cosmeceuticals and Economic Sustainability among Women in South African Rural Communities

Peter Tshepiso Ndhlovu (), Abiodun Olusola Omotayo (), Adeyemi Oladapo Aremu () and Wilfred Otang-Mbeng ()
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Peter Tshepiso Ndhlovu: Indigenous Knowledge Systems (IKS) Centre, Faculty of Natural and Agricultural Sciences, North-West University, Private Bag X2046, Mmabatho 2745, North West Province, South Africa
Abiodun Olusola Omotayo: Food Security and Safety Niche Area, Faculty of Natural and Agricultural Sciences, North-West University, Private Bag X2046, Mmabatho 2745, North West Province, South Africa
Adeyemi Oladapo Aremu: Indigenous Knowledge Systems (IKS) Centre, Faculty of Natural and Agricultural Sciences, North-West University, Private Bag X2046, Mmabatho 2745, North West Province, South Africa
Wilfred Otang-Mbeng: School of Biology and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Agriculture and Natural Sciences, University of Mpumalanga, Private Bag X11283, Mbombela 1200, Mpumalanga Province, South Africa

Economies, 2020, vol. 8, issue 3, 1-1

Abstract: Access to natural resources in the immediate environment is an essential factor that contributes to livelihood in many rural areas. In the current study, we explored the economic potential(s) of the natural herbal-based cosmetic and cosmeceutical enterprise for the welfare of the Vhavenda women. A purposive sampling technique was used to collect data from 79 Vhavenda women and analysed with descriptive and inferential statistics (Tobit regression) as well as budgeting analysis. The majority (61%) of the participants were married with an average household size of five members. Additionally, 39% of the participants were already ageing with an average age-group of 56–70 years. The majority (44%) of the participants were not formally employed while the monthly average total income of R1841.01 (107.37 USD) was recorded with an average per capital expenditure of R1438.42 (83.89 USD). A budgeting cost ratio of 1.28 was recorded, which indicates that for every R1.00 (0.057 USD) invested in the herbal-based cosmetic and cosmeceutical production, an expected return of R1.28 (0.073 USD) was forecasted. Tobit regression results indicated that the determinants of the income of participants were experience level ( p < 0.01), religion affiliation ( p < 0.05) and consumption expenditure ( p < 0.01) among others. Thus, a conscious, introspective and intentional look into this marginalised herbal-based cosmetic and cosmeceutical enterprise as a panacea for improved income and welfare of rural South Africans should be considered.

Keywords: budgeting analysis; rural household income; medicinal plants; women; sustainability; Tobit regression (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: E F I J O Q (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2020
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