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Model Based Regional Estimates of Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Potentials from Rice Croplands in Bangladesh

Khadiza Begum (), Matthias Kuhnert (), Jagadeesh Yeluripati (), Stephen Ogle (), William Parton (), Md Abdul Kader () and Pete Smith ()
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Khadiza Begum: Institute of Biological & Environmental Science, University of Aberdeen, 23 St Machar Drive, Aberdeen AB24 3UU, UK
Matthias Kuhnert: Institute of Biological & Environmental Science, University of Aberdeen, 23 St Machar Drive, Aberdeen AB24 3UU, UK
Jagadeesh Yeluripati: The James Hutton Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen AB15 8QH, UK
Stephen Ogle: Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA
William Parton: Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA
Md Abdul Kader: Department of Soil Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh 2202, Bangladesh
Pete Smith: Institute of Biological & Environmental Science, University of Aberdeen, 23 St Machar Drive, Aberdeen AB24 3UU, UK

Land, 2018, vol. 7, issue 3, 1-18

Abstract: Rice ( Oryza sativa L.) is cultivated as a major crop in most Asian countries and its production is expected to increase to meet the demands of a growing population. This is expected to increase greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from paddy rice ecosystems, unless mitigation measures are in place. It is therefore important to assess GHG mitigation potential whilst maintaining yield. Using the process-based ecosystem model DayCent, a spatial analysis was carried out in a rice harvested area in Bangladesh for the period 1996 to 2015, considering the impacts on soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration, GHG emissions and yield under various mitigation options. An integrated management (IM, a best management practice) considering reduced water, tillage with residue management, reduced mineral nitrogen fertilizer and manure, led to a net offset by, on average, −2.43 t carbon dioxide equivalent (CO 2 -eq.) ha −1 year −1 (GHG removal) and a reduction in yield-scaled emissions intensity by −0.55 to −0.65 t CO 2 -eq. t −1 yield. Under integrated management, it is possible to increase SOC stocks on average by 1.7% per year in rice paddies in Bangladesh, which is nearly 4 times the rate of change targeted by the “4 per mille” initiative arising from the Paris Climate Agreement.

Keywords: greenhouse gas (GHG); rice; mitigation potential; DayCent; spatial; Bangladesh (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: Q15 Q2 Q24 Q28 Q5 R14 R52 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2018
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