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Research and Development Strategy for Fishery Technology Innovation for Sustainable Fishery Resource Management in North-East Asia

Hidemichi Fujii (), Yoshitaka Sakakura (), Atsushi Hagiwara (), John Bostock (), Kiyoshi Soyano () and Yoshiki Matsushita ()
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Yoshitaka Sakakura: Graduate School of Fisheries and Environmental Sciences, Nagasaki University, 1–14 Bunkyo-machi, Nagasaki 852-8521, Japan
Atsushi Hagiwara: Graduate School of Fisheries and Environmental Sciences, Nagasaki University, 1–14 Bunkyo-machi, Nagasaki 852-8521, Japan
John Bostock: Institute of Aquaculture, University of Stirling, Stirling FK9 4LA, UK
Kiyoshi Soyano: Organization for Marine Science and Technology, Nagasaki University, 1-14 Bunkyo-machi, Nagasaki 852-8521, Japan
Yoshiki Matsushita: Graduate School of Fisheries and Environmental Sciences, Nagasaki University, 1–14 Bunkyo-machi, Nagasaki 852-8521, Japan

Sustainability, 2017, vol. 10, issue 1, 1-12

Abstract: The development of fishery technologies supports food sustainability to achieve a steady supply of fish and fishery products. However, the priorities for research and development (R&D) in fishery technologies vary by region due to differences in fish resource availability, environmental concerns, and consumer preferences for fishery products. This study examines trends in fishery technology innovations using data on patents granted as an indicator of changing R&D priorities. To clarify changes in R&D priorities, we apply a decomposition analysis framework that classifies fishery technologies into three types: harvesting, aquaculture, and new products. This study mainly focuses on China, Japan, and Korea as the major fishing countries in the north-east Asia region. The results show that the number of fishery technology patents granted increased between 1993 and 2015; in particular, the number of aquaculture patents granted has grown rapidly since 2012. However, the trend in Japan was the opposite, as the apparent priority given to aquaculture technology innovation decreased between 1993 and 2015. The trends and priority changes for fishery technology inventions vary by country and technology group. This implies that an international policy framework for fishery technology development should recognize that R&D priorities need to reflect diverse characteristics across countries and the technologies employed.

Keywords: aquaculture; decomposition analysis; research and development strategy; fisheries technology; food sustainability; harvesting technology; patent data (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: Q Q0 Q2 Q3 Q5 Q56 O13 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2017
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