EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Recent History, Types, and Future of Modern Caisson Technology: The Way to More Sustainable Practices

Eduardo Cejuela (), Vicente Negro (), Jose María Del Campo (), Mario Martín-Antón (), M. Dolores Esteban () and Jose Santos López-Gutiérrez ()
Additional contact information
Eduardo Cejuela: Department of Civil Engineering, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid, Spain
Vicente Negro: Department of Civil Engineering, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid, Spain
Jose María Del Campo: Department of Civil Engineering, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid, Spain
Mario Martín-Antón: Department of Civil Engineering, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid, Spain
M. Dolores Esteban: Department of Civil Engineering, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid, Spain
Jose Santos López-Gutiérrez: Department of Civil Engineering, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid, Spain

Sustainability, 2018, vol. 10, issue 11, 1-30

Abstract: The construction of caisson breakwaters dates from ancient times (Brindisi battle and Caesarea Maritima , Roman Empire) of yore but has evolved with regards to technology and the materials available at all times (wood, gravel, and rubble mound). The growth in draught in vessels searching for deep water depths for berthing plus environmental problems have led to the 20th century facilitating the boom in vertical types and concrete caissons built in different ways (dry and floating techniques). Furthermore, structural criteria gave way to functional, environmental, and aesthetic criteria. The search for new, more efficient forms led to the construction of increasingly more complex elements including many that still require an economically viable construction system. To where will this search for new materials and forms take us? The use of composite materials could be considered, at the moment, as too expensive, but analyzing the cost with a wider approach, as Life Cycle Assessment, shows us that caissons in composite materials are cost effective and could be a solution. Furthermore, the possibility of using recyclable composites opens up big opportunities of using these materials at affordable costs. Caissons in composites or recycled composites are then a real alternative to concrete caissons. In Spain, two examples can be observed: a berthing area in Canary Island (Puerto del Rosario, South Atlantic Ocean) and a crown wall in Cartagena using polyester fiber bars (Mediterranean Sea). European policy in matters of sustainability promotes the circular economy, which means not only consider construction of caissons in recycled composites should be considered but also the comparison of all materials and construction procedures. Lastly, the calculation of the Environmental Product Declaration (EPD) should be promoted.

Keywords: caisson; floating dock; dry dock; fiberglass; recycling; circular economy (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: Q Q0 Q2 Q3 Q5 Q56 O13 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2018
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
https://www.mdpi.com/2071-1050/10/11/3839/pdf (application/pdf)
https://www.mdpi.com/2071-1050/10/11/3839/ (text/html)

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:11:p:3839-:d:177760

Access Statistics for this article

Sustainability is currently edited by Prof. Dr. Marc A. Rosen

More articles in Sustainability from MDPI, Open Access Journal
Bibliographic data for series maintained by XML Conversion Team ().

 
Page updated 2019-01-12
Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:11:p:3839-:d:177760