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Residential Racial and Socioeconomic Segregation as Predictors of Housing Discrimination in Detroit Metropolitan Area

Roshanak Mehdipanah (), Kiana Bess (), Steve Tomkowiak (), Audrey Richardson (), Carmen Stokes (), Denise White Perkins (), Suzanne Cleage (), Barbara A. Israel () and Amy J. Schulz ()
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Roshanak Mehdipanah: School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
Kiana Bess: School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
Steve Tomkowiak: Fair Housing Center of Metropolitan Detroit, Detroit, MI 48213, USA
Audrey Richardson: School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
Carmen Stokes: School of Nursing, University of Michigan, Flint, MI 48502, USA
Denise White Perkins: Institute on Multicultural Health, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI 48202, USA
Suzanne Cleage: Eastside Community Network, Detroit, MI 48215, USA
Barbara A. Israel: School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
Amy J. Schulz: School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA

Sustainability, 2020, vol. 12, issue 24, 1-16

Abstract: This study examined neighborhood racial and socioeconomic characteristics associated with housing discrimination (HD) in the Detroit Metropolitan Area, Michigan. Using novel neighborhood level data from the Fair Housing Center of Metropolitan Detroit in combination with the American Community Survey, incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were derived to examine associations between HD cases and percentage of homeowners, non-Hispanic White (NHW) residents, and median income. Models were stratified to examine these associations for race-, disability- and rent-related HD outcomes. Between 2008–2017, 988 HD incidents were reported. Independently, neighborhood proportion NHW, income, and homeownership were inversely associated with all-types of HD. Jointly, the neighborhood predictors remained significant indicators. Similar patterns were observed in race-, disability- and rent-related HD when neighborhood predictors were examined independently. In the joint models, household income no longer predicted race-related HD, while proportion NHW no longer predicted disability- and rent-related HD. Results suggest HD may be more frequent in neighborhoods with greater proportions of NHB or Hispanic residents, those with lower incomes, and greater proportion of rental households. These findings have great social and health implications and warrant further exploration of how HD contributes to social and health inequities in lower income, predominantly NHB and Hispanic neighborhoods and those with more renters.

Keywords: housing; discrimination; inequities; fair housing; segregation (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: O13 Q Q0 Q2 Q3 Q5 Q56 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2020
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