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Climate Variability and Transnational Migration: A Dyadic Analysis

Zorzeta Bakaki ()
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Zorzeta Bakaki: Department of Government, University of Essex, Colchester CO4 3SQ, UK

Sustainability, 2021, vol. 13, issue 1, 1-13

Abstract: This research builds upon and extends earlier research by studying whether people leave their homes and migrate to other states due to weather changes associated with climate variability. In particular, I examine how push and pull factors jointly influence emigration. Empirically, the theoretical arguments are analysed quantitatively with time-series cross-section data on transnational migration since the 1960s. The results suggest that climate indicators are strongly and robustly associated with transnational migration. The dyadic nature of the analysis allows for a close examination of patterns across pairs of countries by clearly distinguishing between “source” and “destination.” Controlling for unobserved influences via country and year fixed effects, as well as a series of robustness checks, further increases the confidence in this finding. This research substantially improves our understanding of climate-induced migration and emphasizes that it is, in fact, a global phenomenon.

Keywords: climate variability; temperature; precipitation; transnational migration; dyadic analysis (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: O13 Q Q0 Q2 Q3 Q5 Q56 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2021
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