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Gender Differences in Knowledge, Use, and Collection of Wild Edible Plants in Three Spanish Areas

Rufino Acosta-Naranjo (), Ramón Rodríguez-Franco (), Antonio Jesús Guzmán-Troncoso (), Manuel Pardo- de-Santayana (), Laura Aceituno-Mata (), José Gómez-Melara (), Pablo Domínguez (), Isabel Díaz-Reviriego (), Jessica González-Nateras () and Victoria Reyes-García ()
Additional contact information
Rufino Acosta-Naranjo: Departamento de Antropología Social, Universidad de Sevilla, 41004 Sevilla, Spain
Ramón Rodríguez-Franco: Departamento de Antropología Social, Universidad de Sevilla, 41004 Sevilla, Spain
Antonio Jesús Guzmán-Troncoso: Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia (UNED), 28015 Madrid, Spain
Manuel Pardo- de-Santayana: Departamento de Biología (Botánica), Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid, Spain
Laura Aceituno-Mata: Departamento de Biología (Botánica), Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid, Spain
José Gómez-Melara: Departamento de Antropología Social, Universidad de Sevilla, 41004 Sevilla, Spain
Pablo Domínguez: Laboratoire Geographie de l Environnement, CNRS-UT2J, 31058 Toulouse, France
Isabel Díaz-Reviriego: Social-Ecological Systems Institute (SESI), Faculty of Sustainability, Leuphana Universität Lüneburg, Universitaetsallee 1, 21335 Lüneburg, Germany
Jessica González-Nateras: Departamento de Antropología Social, Universidad de Sevilla, 41004 Sevilla, Spain
Victoria Reyes-García: Institut de Ciència i Tecnologia Ambientals (ICTA), Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Bellatera, 08193 Barcelona, Spain

Sustainability, 2021, vol. 13, issue 5, 1-16

Abstract: Many ethnobotanical studies have shown differences in the knowledge and practices held by men and women. Using ethnographic fieldwork, a survey, and secondary data from three different areas in Spain, this study shows a geographical pattern in women’s and men’s relations with wild edible plants. In the case studies from Southern Spain, Doñana, and Sierra Morena Extremeña, women gather less wild edible plants than men, while in the Central Spain case study, Sierra Norte de Madrid, the difference is less marked. We explain this difference through the construction and distribution of agrarian spaces, particularly with regards to land tenure type and urban centers size. In the southern cases, large agrarian properties are more prevalent than in Sierra Norte de Madrid, where common lands and small and medium properties predominate. Additionally, in Doñana, big urban agro-towns dominate, whereas in Sierra Norte de Madrid and Sierra Morena Extremeña little towns are the norm. Overall, our study suggests that gendered differences in the use of natural resources are better understood if contextualized in a large socioecological context.

Keywords: biodiversity; ethnobotany; gender; local knowledge; Spain (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: O13 Q Q0 Q2 Q3 Q5 Q56 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2021
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
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