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A Review and Classification Framework of Traceability Approaches for Identifying Product Supply Chain Counterfeiting

Sotiris P. Gayialis (), Evripidis P. Kechagias (), Georgios A. Papadopoulos () and Dimitrios Masouras ()
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Sotiris P. Gayialis: Sector of Industrial Management and Operational Research, School of Mechanical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, 15780 Athens, Greece
Evripidis P. Kechagias: Sector of Industrial Management and Operational Research, School of Mechanical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, 15780 Athens, Greece
Georgios A. Papadopoulos: Sector of Industrial Management and Operational Research, School of Mechanical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, 15780 Athens, Greece
Dimitrios Masouras: Sector of Industrial Management and Operational Research, School of Mechanical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, 15780 Athens, Greece

Sustainability, 2022, vol. 14, issue 11, 1-20

Abstract: Counterfeiting is found today in many industries and in various forms with severe consequences for supply chain operations. Products counterfeiting can be detected in consumer goods such as clothing, food and beverages, accessories, pharmaceuticals, electronics, and luxury goods. The continuous violations in the supply chain have led to the need for mobilization of all involved stakeholders to overcome counterfeiting challenges. Effective traceability seems to be the only way to combat this phenomenon, ensuring safe and sustainable supply chain operations. This paper presents a structured literature review on traceability approaches for combatting the product supply chain counterfeiting phenomenon that led to forming a structured classification framework. The performed analysis aims to identify trends and good practices and can be used as a guideline for real-life projects against supply chain counterfeiting. The results show that traditional traceability methods are not effective as they can be easily falsified using today’s technological advancements. However, these same advancements also present valuable technologies such as blockchain and the internet of things to ensure safe and sustainable supply chain operations.

Keywords: traceability; supply chain; counterfeiting; technologies; blockchain; internet of things; industry sectors (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: O13 Q Q0 Q2 Q3 Q5 Q56 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2022
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
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