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Can the “Euro-Leaf” Logo Affect Consumers’ Willingness-To-Buy and Willingness-To-Pay for Organic Food and Attract Consumers’ Preferences? An Empirical Study in Greece

Charalampia N. Anastasiou (), Kiriaki M. Keramitsoglou (), Nikos Kalogeras (), Maria I. Tsagkaraki (), Ioanna Kalatzi () and Konstantinos Tsagarakis
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Charalampia N. Anastasiou: Business and Environmental Technology Economics Laboratory (BETECO), Department of Environmental Engineering, Democritus University of Thrace, Xanthi 67100, Greece
Kiriaki M. Keramitsoglou: Business and Environmental Technology Economics Laboratory (BETECO), Department of Environmental Engineering, Democritus University of Thrace, Xanthi 67100, Greece
Nikos Kalogeras: Marketing and Consumer Behaviour Group, Department of Social Sciences, Wageningen University & Research, Wageningen 6706 KN, The Netherlands
Maria I. Tsagkaraki: Business and Environmental Technology Economics Laboratory (BETECO), Department of Environmental Engineering, Democritus University of Thrace, Xanthi 67100, Greece
Ioanna Kalatzi: Business and Environmental Technology Economics Laboratory (BETECO), Department of Environmental Engineering, Democritus University of Thrace, Xanthi 67100, Greece

Sustainability, 2017, vol. 9, issue 8, 1-17

Abstract: The “Euro-leaf” organic certification logo was adopted and made compulsory by the European Union (EU) a few years ago; the level of consumers’ recognition of this logo has been explored. This paper provides important insights into the effectiveness of the logo in the Greek market. The “Euro-leaf” logo was compared with the two previous EU organic logos; i.e., the voluntary “Organic Farming” and the withdrawn “Bio”. In total, 472 face-to-face interviews were conducted using actual presentations of five officially certified food products. The aim of this research was to investigate the consumers’ willingness-to-buy (WTB), willingness-to-pay (WTP), and their preference towards each of the three logos used for the certification of organic products. Our analysis concludes that for the time being the new logo has failed to develop into a powerful instrument for affecting consumers’ WTB and WTP. Furthermore, it was found to have been the least influential factor that determined their preferences. Design changes and improvements might be necessary in order to better communicate the organic food message.

Keywords: organic certification logos; preferences; willingness-to-buy; willingness-to-pay (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: Q Q0 Q2 Q3 Q5 Q56 O13 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2017
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
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