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Internet Shopping Behaviors of Generation Y African-American Based on Apparel Production Involvement

Jung-Im Seo

International Business Research, 2016, vol. 9, issue 9, 64-77

Abstract: This study investigates internet shopping behaviors of Generation Y African-Americans (GYAAs), based on their levels of apparel product involvement associated with internet shopping orientations, internet situational influences, internet behavioral intentions, and previous internet shopping experiences. Data were collected from African-American college students of several universities in southeastern United States. Of the total surveys collected, 240 completed surveys were analyzed using multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA), univariate analysis of variance (ANOVA), one-way ANOVA, chi-square, and phi-coefficient. This study attempts to understand internet shopping behaviors of GYAA. This research demonstrates that GYAAs have unique internet shopping behaviors toward on-line apparel products, showing that two involvement groups differ significantly in many ways. Internet shopping is highly attractive to high-involvement GYAA consumers due to its entertainment during their web-surfing as well as many other reasons such as its fashion-consciousness and personality rather than the reasons of convenience, expense, and familiarity, which are more sensitive to low-involvement GYAA consumers.

Keywords: internet shopping behavior; product involvement; Generation Y; African-American (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2016
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