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Carbon tax acceptability with information provision and mixed revenue uses

Sara Maestre-Andrés (), Stefan Drews, Ivan Savin and Jeroen Bergh
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Sara Maestre-Andrés: Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona
Stefan Drews: Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona
Jeroen Bergh: Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona

Nature Communications, 2021, vol. 12, issue 1, 1-10

Abstract: Abstract Public acceptability of carbon taxation depends on its revenue use. Which single or mixed revenue use is most appropriate, and which perceptions of policy effectiveness and fairness explain this, remains unclear. It is, moreover, uncertain how people’s prior knowledge about carbon taxation affects policy acceptability. Here we conduct a survey experiment to test how distinct revenue uses, prior knowledge, and information provision about the functioning of carbon taxation affect policy perceptions and acceptability. We show that spending revenues on climate projects maximises acceptability as well as perceived fairness and effectiveness. A mix of different revenue uses is also popular, notably compensating low-income households and funding climate projects. In addition, we find that providing information about carbon taxation increases acceptability for unspecified revenue use and for people with more prior tax knowledge. Furthermore, policy acceptability is more strongly related to perceived fairness than to perceived effectiveness.

Date: 2021
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:nat:natcom:v:12:y:2021:i:1:d:10.1038_s41467-021-27380-8

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DOI: 10.1038/s41467-021-27380-8

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